Louisiana Oil Project

Louisiana has had successful oil and gas wells drilled through a number of formations.  Many of them are not economically viable for sustainable oil and natural gas production, but some are. While a discussion of which formations are economically viable is beyond the purpose of this article, a brief overview of the basics of the region’s notable oil and gas formations should help the would-be explorer of oil and natural gas determine where to possibly start.

Era: Cenozoic
- System: Tertiary
– Series: Eocene
— Group: Claiborne
—- Formation: Cockfield formation is a fine-grained sand and silt formation.
—- Formation: Cook Mountain formation is a fossiliferous marine clay.
—- Formation: Sparta formation is a sandy sequence with interbedded clay lenses
—- Formation: Cane River Formation is a glauconitic fossiliferous clay.

Era: Cenozoic
- System: Tertiary
– Series: Eocene
— Group: Wilcox
—- Formation: Wilcox formation is a prolific hydrocarbon production formation in Texas, Louisiana   and Mississippi. The Wilcox formation has been one of the most studied formations in the United States as it is one of the most complex, continental to deltaic deposits of sands and sandy clays but also contains beds of carbonaceous clays and lignite, siderite concentrations thin beds and lenses of bentonitic clay and lenses and boulders of quartzite. In some areas, the Wilcox has been broken up and referred to as the Berger, Saline, and the Detonti.

Era: Cenozoic
- System: Tertiary
– Series: Paleocene
— Group: Midway
—- Formation: Midway formation contains numerous microfossils of Ammobaculites and Spiroplectammin that flourished before the withdrawal of the seas, which created the base of the Paleocene in the Gulf Coastal Plain province. The Lower Midway Formation is calcareous, larly or chalky, shales. The Upper Midway is mostly mudstone.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Upper Cretaceous
– Series: Gulfian
— Group: Navarro
—- Formation: Arkadelphia Formation is a marl thats consist of shallow marine sediment that is a light gray chalk or marl with calcareous, micaceous sandstone, and minor volcanic ash.
—- Formation: Nacatoch formation is typically a sand shallow marine deposit of fine-to-medium grained quartz sandstone, sandy limestone, clay, marl, and shale.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Upper Cretaceous
– Series: Gulfian
— Group: Taylor
—- Formation: Marlbrook formation is often referred to as Ozan or Annona.
—- Formation: Annona formation is often referred to as Ozan or Marlbrook.
—- Formation: Ozan formation is a shallow marine deposit of hard, gray glauconitic fossiliferous chalk, calcareous shale, marl, fine grained sandstone and siltstone. Ozan formations have produced hydrocarbons from the Meakin, Baker, Graves and Buckrange Sands.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Upper Cretaceous
– Series: Gulfian
— Group: Austin
—- Formation: Brownstown marl is of dark gray calcareous clay, marl, and shale. The Brownstown formation often contains large limestone beds that are free of sand.
—- Formation: Tokio formation is separate from the woodbine sandstone as it contains distinct beds of conglomerate of novaculite. This formation consists of dark gray lignitic clays and cross-bedded sands.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Upper Cretaceous
– Series: Gulfian
— Group: Eagle Ford
—- Formation: Eagle Ford formation is more prevalent in southern Texas, but thick traces can be found throughout Louisiana.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Upper Cretaceous
– Series: Gulfian
— Group: Tuscaloosa
—- Formation: The Tuscaloosa Shale stretches from Texas through the center of Louisiana into southwest Mississippi. This formation has recently gained a massive amount of attention in the public as the higher price of oil has increased the economics of the oil and gas potential of this formation.
—- Formation: Woodbine Oil Shale is marked by gavel of varying sizes.
The Woodbine formation has water-lain volcanic tuffs that are sandy and cross-bedded. Any sandstone in this formation contains less than ten percent quartz but have a large quantity of oligoclase, ti-rich pyroxenes, and magnetite. The sandstone of this formation contains smectitic clay formed by the diagenesis of the volcanic material. Since it is of a volcanic nature, the formation often contains igneous rocks which often impede exploration.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Lower Cretaceous
– Series: Comanchean
— Group: Trinity
—- Formation: Washita-Fredericksburg is a very complex formation with varying degrees of lithology.
—- Formation: Paluxy, Walnut, and Goodland formations are mostly made up of oyster shells of varying densities.
—- Formation: Upper Glen Rose Mooringspot formation is of the Early Albian age and is a carbonate that contains crystalline and fossiliferous limestone, sandstone, anhydrite, and shale components that can be found as a heterogeneous mixture through the matrix of the formations.
—- Formation: Upper Glen Rose Ferry Lake formation is an anhydrite and is one of the most common formations along the Gulf Coastal Plain. This formation was created back when the supercontinent Rodessa became a low lagoonal sea that harvested a wide range of life, but this formation has yielded little crude oil or natural gas to date.
—- Formation: Lower Glen Rose Rodessa formations are often more strata-rich than the James formation. It is primarily an oolitic, crystalline structure that is said to be a lenticular, fine-grained, sandy limestone. anhydrite, coquinoid limestones and gray shales. The Mitchell Sand has been known to produce crude oil in certain parts of Louisiana.
—- Formation: Lower Glen Rose James formation is of the late aptian age that once supported a low energy, open-shelf environment. Its lithology is heterogeneous throughout the formation. The James Formation is made up of a fossiliferous, dense limestone, with red to gray shale. It is also often referred to as a porous, oolitic, and fossiliferous to fossiliferous-fragmental limestone.
—- Formation: Lower Glen Rose Pine Island formation is a calcareous black shale with interbedded fine-grained sandstone and minor crystalline limestone layers that are thought to have supported a lagoonal to nearshore marine environment. The Hogg Sandstone unit of this formation has been a primary zone capable of producing hydrocarbons of both crude oil and natural gas.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Lower Cretaceous
– Series: Coahuilan
— Group: Nuevo Leon
—- Formation: Sligo formation often makes contact with the Pine Island Shale and is even found mixed within the Hosston formation, which is associated with the dark, shallow marine sediment of the nonmarine hosston sediment. The Sligo in the Louisiana area is often composed of gray to brown shales, limy shales and limestones, which contain lentils of dark gray oolitic argillaceous fossiliferous and sandy limestones. These fossiliferous shales are dark in color within the formation. Northern Louisiana’s natural gas production has commonly been found to produce out of the Pettet porosity zones of this formation. These zones are commonly referred to as the Pettet Limestone, which comes from the productive porous pelletal-ooid limestone. A large share of Louisiana’s oil production has also come from the Sligo formation.
—- Formation: Hosston formation, otherwise known as the Travis Peek, is usually composed of fluvio-deltaic sediments which were formed in the early Cretaceous age. The Hosston Formation overlies the Cotton Valley, and is a sandstone that is fine-graded. It is common to find clay and shales that are dark red to pinkish in color in the upper portion of the Hosston formation, as opposed to the lower half, which is lighter gray, pale green or even dark brown in color. The Hosston Formation has contained the early Cretaceous marker spore Cicatricosisporites angicanalis, and the Cretaceous dinoflagellate Oligospharidium lifeforms which have been associated with the creation of crude oil and natural gas.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Jurassic
– Series: Upper
— Group: Cotton Valley
—- Formation: Schuler Facies are referred to as either Shongaloo or Dorcheat. The Upper Shongaloo is shale, sandstone and basal conglomerate that is red in color, where the Lower Dorcheat is a multi-colored shale, along with  and sandstone and fossiliferous limestone.
—- Formation: Bossier Facies are considered the lower portion of the Cotton Valley Group. This formation is a black shale, including sand which can also be dark gray in color.  The Cotton Valley Sands have been known to be associated with crude oil, natural gas and even valuable gas condensates.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Jurassic
– Series: Upper
— Group: Louark
—- Formation: The Haynesville or Buckner formation is found above the Smackover Formation. This formation is primarily composed of fine-grained sandstones, shale, anhydrite, and small amounts of oolitic limestone, which once harbored jurassic lifeforms. The upper Haynesville formation has sandstone and shale characteristics. The lower portion, often referred to as the Lower Buckner, is a red shale, sandstone, anhydrite, and limestone which are of a lens-like structure.
—- Formation: The Smackover oil formation consists of dense oolitic limestone. The lower Smackover is extremely fine in texture and contains anhydrites which are associated with the salinity of the prehistoric sea. The upper Smackover formation was shallow and contained a perfect breeding area for corals, brachiopods, pelecypods, and gastropods. In the southeastern part of the state, the upper limestone is said to increase in the amount of sand, which often indicates a meeting of the reefs from the seas with the land. In areas where the Haynesville is missing, the Smackover usually exists.
—- Formation: The Norphlet is found above the Louisiana Salt, and is usually a gravel with red and gray mudstone, and largely fluvial.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Jurassic
– Series: Middle
— Group: Louark
—- Formation: Louann Salt formation is a coarse, crystalline salt which is free of terrigenous siliciclastic material with anhydrite streaks. Cores taken in this formation have recorded the salt to be white, gray to pale-pink and even orange in color. This formation is thought to be marine waters that originally flowed into the Basin, which was separate from the prehistoric sea.
—- Formation: The Werner oil formation contains a lower-red bed, which usually consists of very dense anhydrite in the upper portions.

Era: Mesozoic
- System: Triassic
– Series: Upper
—- Formation: The Eagle Mills crude oil and natural gas bearing formation is generally composed of dense red beds and difficult to work with igneous rocks.

* The photos on this page do not represent any specific locations, projects, or company and are shown for visual purposes only. This is not a project for sale or a solicitation to purchase any oil wells for sale or natural gas wells for sale. This is not a presentation or offer to sell securities or to sell any other product whatsoever. This post is only for informational purposes to aid individuals who wish to develop oil and gas assets in this state.

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